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20121231
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protests. at the time, critics accused mohamed morsi of a power grab and adviser to morsi says the government will push forward to a referendum on the new constitution, despite concerns from the opposition. going to go live to cairo in a few minutes here. >>> a well known islamic militant, the leader of a terror network, is locked up in egypt and there is an american connection. the fbi is working to figure out what role, if any, the man played in the attack on the consulate in libya that killed four americans including the u.s. ambassador. a full report, everything we know about this man, coming up, coming right up here on cnn. >>> congress faces a so-called fiscal cliff and only 24 days. and it is what house speaker john boehner did not say that is drawing attention tonight. when questioned by reporters yesterday, boehner would not comment on whether there is room for compromise on the president's demand for higher tax rates, on high income americans. boehner and the president spoke by phone this week, but in public comments, appear to have no -- made no progress. >>> same se
it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
by the muslim brotherhood. that's the party of the president, mohamed morsi. frustrated coptic christians and liberals walked out before the votes because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the mauritanian president is warning tension in mali could backfire. locals could align with rebels. one group they are concerned about is al qaeda in the islamic maghreb. that's the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us that aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger in the region. without international military intervention, mali's military won't be able to push them out. he told me he doesn't even have enough guns for his soldiers. >>> it's been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing get it back? incomes and consumer spending fell in october. experts we spoke to said sandy had a significant impact on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you thi
if mohammed morsi gets his way at the ballot box. tomorrow, the second half of egypt votes on a draft constitution that critics say begins the process of turning the arab world populist country in an islamic state. at the halfway point, those in favor of the move lead the vote by a double digit margin. saturday includes voters in mostly southern egyptian provinces, typically poorer and experts say likely to favor the islamist by wider margin. the latest round of violence began last month when morsi gave himself almost king like powers bridging thousands of people to the street in protest and forcing the army to ring the presidential residents with tanks. the speed at which morsi is pushing through constitution that limits the free speech and women's right, while being based largely on shiria or islamic law is increasing fears that the muslim brotherhood is ruling egypt by that old adage. "one man, one vote. one time." john? >> leland vittert in jerusalem. thanks. still ahead. solutions to flip the script when it comes to debt and deficit. first, the national rival association calls fo
constitution there. supporters of mohammed morsi each staged mass demonstrations in cairo throughout the day. in tahrir square security officials say masked gunmen fired on the protesters, wounded at least 9. after weeks of chaos there is word of possible talks tomorrow to try to calm the chaos. of course, this all started with president morsi sweeping power grab. the protesters forced him largely to give up those powers but he is still pushing ahead with plans for saturday's referendum. officials there say it's likely to happen despite some 90% of judges voting not to oversee it. greg palkot with the news live tonight in cairo. greg? >> demonstrations were big and noisy here tonight in cairo. got close it the presidential palace unlike last week when several people died, there were no clashes between the two sides tonight. maybe we're told because president morsi's muslim brotherhood we're told not to crack any heads this time. this unrest has left one economic casualty. egypt is deferring its request for much needed 5 billion-dollar loan from the imf. the government probably deciding this
? >>> in egypt, president mohamed morsi is calling for talks to end the political crisis in the country. the opposition is calling for a boycott of that meeting. at least six people are dead after protests turned violent. anti-morsi supporters are demonstrating against the president and the new constitution. they say morsi has given himself too much power, but the president says the powers are only temporary and will become void once the new constitution is adopted. >>> now back to the u.s. and the controversy over the benghazi attack. secretary of state hillary clinton will testify at an open congressional hearing. her testimony will follow the release of a report by the state department's accountability review board. the state department has been under fire for its handling of the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >>> the syrian crisis could reach a new level. with concerns that the syrian regime could possibly use chemical weapons. we'll tell you how the u.s. is reacting. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew wh
by the egyptian president mohammed morsi. it is expected to take place at any time. we're told that during the day he met with the army chief as well as his ministers to try to come up with some way to stablize the country. he was in the presidential palace earlier in the day. this despite the fact that there was some very violent clashes in the last 24 hours just outside that palace. take a look at the tape and you can see what took place just a few hours ago. on one side supporters of th president morsi. on the other secular groups say they oppose the islamist agenda. during the clashes firebombs and rocks were thrown. there was also gunfire. as you mentioned at least seven dead and at least 600 injured. the republican guard placed tanks and armored vehicles outside the presidential palace this morning and the commander of the guard which is primarily tasked with protecting the presidential compound tried to assure egyptians in this conflict it is not going to take sides. in the last few hours the guard ordered rival protesters to leave the presidential palace. morsi supporters have withdrawn an
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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